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Information Literacy Objectives & Assessment

ILOs and Assessments for the Library, Updated Spring 2022

Skills

  • Finding Sources
    • Galileo
    • Book catalog
    • Subject-specific databases
  • Search Strategies
    • Keywords
    • Limiters

ACRL Language

Searching for information is often nonlinear and iterative, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops.

The act of searching often begins with a question that directs the act of finding needed information. Encompassing inquiry, discovery, and serendipity, searching identifies both possible relevant sources as well as the means to access those sources. Experts realize that information searching is a contextualized, complex experience that affects, and is affected by, the cognitive, affective, and social dimensions of the searcher. Novice learners may search a limited set of resources, while experts may search more broadly and deeply to determine the most appropriate information within the project scope. Likewise, novice learners tend to use few search strategies, while experts select from various search strategies, depending on the sources, scope, and context of the information need.

Knowledge Practices

Learners who are developing their information literate abilities

  • determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs;
  • identify interested parties, such as scholars, organizations, governments, and industries, who might produce information about a topic and then determine how to access that information;
  • utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching;
  • match information needs and search strategies to appropriate search tools;
  • design and refine needs and search strategies as necessary, based on search results;
  • understand how information systems (i.e., collections of recorded information) are organized in order to access relevant information;
  • use different types of searching language (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) appropriately;
  • manage searching processes and results effectively.

Dispositions

Learners who are developing their information literate abilities

  • exhibit mental flexibility and creativity
  • understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results
  • realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search
  • seek guidance from experts, such as librarians, researchers, and professionals
  • recognize the value of browsing and other serendipitous methods of information gathering
  • persist in the face of search challenges, and know when they have enough information to complete the information task

Objective 2

Access the information effectively and efficiently

FRAMEWORK: SEARCHING AS A STRATEGIC EXPLORATION

Lesson Objectives: Upon completion of information literacy instruction, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic GALILEO functions (eg: results list, email, cite tool)
  2. Build an effective search strategy including determining keywords.
  3. Search the library catalog in order to locate an appropriate resource
  4. Identify appropriate library databases for specific research needs.
  5. Refine and narrow searches using built-in database limiters.

2a: Basic Galileo Functions

Demonstrate knowledge of basic GALILEO functions (eg: results list, email, cite tool)

  • Walk through process and point out all the relevant basic functions.
  • Include an annotated screenshot in LibGuide/student resource pointing to basic functions in Galileo.
  • For review, ask students to come up to the computer and point out functions (can be part of overall review at end of class if time allows).

2b: Effective Search Strategies

Build an effective search strategy including determining keywords.

  • Dissect a research topic as a class. Ask the students point out keywords. Also have the students think about synonyms or similar terms to search as well.
  • Introduce students to Boolean operators.          

-      Use venn diagrams

-      Demonstrate with class activity

-      Show students how terms change search results

2c: Library Catalog

Search the library catalog in order to locate an appropriate resource

  • Walk students through how to find the catalog
  • Use sample topic or student suggestion to start a search
  • Point out basic functions including limiters, cite tool, results list, etc. Explain different functions. Ask students why specific functions might be useful in their search.

Include an annotated screenshot in libguide/student resource pointing to basic functions and limiters in Gil Find.

2d: Appropriate Databases

Identify appropriate library databases for specific research needs.

  • Explain the difference between general and subject databases.
  • Show students how to locate databases by subject.
  • Give students examples of databases appropriate to their subject.

2e: Limiters

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