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Library Resources for Faculty

The "One-Shot"

"One-Shots" are a one-time visit to your class (we recommend at least a 30 minute session), that focuses on search strategies, using the library resources, and getting in contact with a librarian.

The "Zoom"

Live Zoom classes are just like a traditional class visit, except the librarian comes to your class in Zoom. Nearly everything else is the same!

The "Workshop"

Workshopping with students is an hour or longer session where the librarian understands their assignment parameters and research topics, and gives one-on-one attention to students - focusing on what they will need to succeed in your class for this assignment.

Workshops without an assignment or topic are also available to students through librarians using the library classroom, and they usually offer students one-on-one attention for a specific aspect of technology that could help student become more academically successful. For example, Cartersville library hosts a workshop on Zotero, a citation generator, for students, faculty, and staff.

The "Extended"

"Extended" library services are offered to classes who wish to scaffold the assignment and meet multiple times throughout the semester. The usual amount is 4 times. The first time introduces the research and library resources, the second time focuses on the topics and finding specific sources to use, the third time focuses on an annotated bibliography or citing in-text using quotes and paraphrases correctly in the paper, and the fourth time focuses on citations and the reference list/works cited page.

The "Flipped"

One of our librarians tried a "flipped instruction" concept in a GHC Human Communications class.  The librarian set up a the usual guide, but with a twist.  Five short videos about key library resources were created.  Student groups (assigned by the instructor at the beginning of the semester) were each given one of these videos to watch.  On the "Library Day" the students presented the library material, and the librarian graded them on content.  (The instructor critiqued style and delivery.)

This is a true active learning assignment.  It works well for COMM classes because the class is intended to hone students' presentation skills.  What better way to do that than show fellow students how to search and use tools in a particular database?

If you'd like to see the guide, you can find it here.

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